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Category Archives: Family Life

Sculpting The Second Half of Life

I recently attended an intriguing dinner in Brooklyn Heights, initially set up to talk about the gift and burden of our longer lives.

The impetus was a visit by Jay Goldfarb, an American who runs a healing therapies retreat center in Switzerland. (As we nibbled on cheese and crackers, we talked about the last brown bear . . . read more

Interruptions Can Be Fatal

We’ve all heard of the distracted pilots who overshot the Minneapolis airport. But did you know that medical errors due to distraction place many people in danger every day?

A reader sent me a fascinating dispatch from the medical world on a series of San Francisco-area programs to reduce medical errors . . . read more

The Attention Movement – Something’s Stirring

Months ago, Cali Williams Yost had a wish. In her FastCompany blog, she hoped that Distracted would start an attention movement similar to the new environmentalism sparked by Rachel Carson’s Silent Spring. And indeed, wherever I speak, people everywhere are asking, ‘where do we start? How do we regain our focus and spark . . . read more

Is Facebook “infantilizing” Us?

No one likes to be called a baby, whether they are age five or 35. That’s one reason why recent comments by British neuroscientist Susan Greenfield that today’s technologies may be “infantilizing the brain” are inspiring heated debate – and plentiful misunderstanding. I don’t agree with all that she said about virtual social . . . read more

We’re Busy. We’re Productive. But In What Sense of the Word?

We’re so busy, so “productive,” ticking off items off our agendas, clicking through over-stuffed in-boxes. But in what sense are we productive ? Could it be that we are racing ahead in the most shallow senses of the word?

 This is a particularly timely question as we reap the fall-out from an era of . . . read more

A Dutiful Girl Goes to the Inauguration

 

                 When the Berlin Wall fell, I was a 29-year-old graduate student in international politics at the London School of Economics. As the news hit, many of my younger classmates jumped on flights to Germany to witness history being made. I stayed in the library, unwilling to risk tarnishing my . . . read more